Monday, March 27, 2017

Bunkzilla - The Move!

So.  Now, we had to somehow move this beast from the garage where it was built, all the way through the north pasture, up the hill to the gate, into the south pasture, and back down the hill to the final destination.

It took several phases to ease it out of the garage and get it set so that Dale could stick the forks under it, but finally, it was underway.  I walked on ahead, ready to take some candids when it fell off the forks, and/or open the gate.  As it was, Dale expertly carted it over the hills and thru the valleys until he made the gate.  Then, it was all downhill from there.  Once in place, we went back to the barn for two bales of hay, came back, and loaded it up.  A small glitch - the door slides the wrong way for the placement of Bunkzilla on the downhill side of a hill - was temporarily fixed with a scrap block of wood.  A more permanent fix is already engineered and will eventually be implemented.  The tarp is a temporary fix as well, until the roofing is ordered and installed.

This morning, Ruffie and Danny stood in front of it munching away.  Success!!  











Bunkzilla - The Build!

It was time to tackle a project long overdue.  We've needed a way to feed the cows in the south pasture in all weather conditions.  We had just a plain ol' plastic half pipe style bunk for a few years, but once things like hay and pellets got wet, the cows wouldn't eat it, and it was a mess.

If you can't tell by these pictures that this bunkzilla was built by an engineer, for feeding big, hungry and sometimes itchy cows, go get some glasses.

We'll show the move in the next post.

 Really Big Red with load #2 of wood.  It would make two more trips before we had all we needed
 The base laid out.  Treated 6" X 12" runners
 Every project needs a manager.  We only hire the best
 Base complete











 Junior project managers observes the PM inspecting the inside

 Managing to be in the way, mostly
 Dale's clever sliding door idea.  Load the hay without having to undo the bales and piece them into the bunk from the front
 Runner base for the sliding door
 Framed
 Sliding door closed.  Manager seems to be okay with it.  Hard to tell

 Sliding door completed



2 Ewes, 24 Hours and 5 Lambs

Well, not sure what's going on with the post, but it's a bit wacky, so bear with me if things don't seem to make sense.

Saturday night, I knew 10 year old Twyla was so very, very close up.  So, when I went in to feed on Sunday morning, I wasn't surprised to see two lambs, including one arriving as I did.

What I didn't expect was to see a THIRD lamb pop up from the other side of her.  Yes, good ol' Twy had her a set of triplets.  As did her daughter Ginger last summer.  A tiny ewe, a huge ewe, and a fine ram right in the middle.

This morning, it was deja vu all over again, but this time, I had the camera out and ready, and just caught Ginger delivering her second ram lamb.  Two fine boys for her this time.

Since the pictures are all screwy here, I'll do my best.  Enjoy the cuteness overload, and beware of some ick and goo down the line!


Less than 12 hours from delivery
A lot of legs there!
Ram lamb
Ewe #2 ( third born)
Tiny ewe #1
Ram, ewe, ewe
Who's up for milkshakes!
Ewe #3
The look on Twyla's face says it all

Son finds a cozy spot on mom's huge udder
And, here come's Ginger's #2 ram!

Yes, it was that fast
Less than 10 minutes, up and at 'em
Ginger's boys
Ginger's boys, 6 hours old

Twyla's daughter
Twyla's son
She may be tiny, but she's feisty!